dreadedcandiru2 (dreadedcandiru2) wrote,
dreadedcandiru2
dreadedcandiru2

Elizabeth and Therese: "Don't make me feel bad."

It seems obvious that the main sticking point to Françoise having any sort of relationship with the birth mother will be Elizabeth's refusal to let Thérèse anywhere near her child. She's gone on record as saying that her rival "threw" her husband and child away and clearly believes that by doing so, she's given up any right to ever re-establish a bond with them. This is, of course, a load of bollocks. Unless Therese is an sctive threat to Francie's physical or emoptional well-being, Liz has no say whatsoever in the matter, no matter how much she or her imbecile harpy of a mother yowl about the unfairness. This seems especially irnoic when you realize that if anyone has the right to scream about unjust treatment, it's Anthony's first wife. First off, it seems obvious that Liz has made no effort whatsoever to put herself in Therese's place. She's never admitted that the woman had a right to fear that her mere presence would be a danger to her marriage to Anthony even though what Therese has said would happen has done so. Also, she's never let facts that might present Therese in a positive light sully her mind. Does she admit that her parents and their friends made Therese into a pariah for getting in the way of their hopes and dreams? Nope. Will she see that she put too much on her plate, broke under the strain and ran to sanity in the arms of the man she left Anthony for? No frikking way! Can her mind's eye see that a mother who, while in the sinister grip of post-partum depression, rejected her child has every right to try again when she's gotten the right kind of help? That eye has always been blind so, no. Why is this? First off, we have the Pattersonian dread of having to apologize. They act like a group of spoiled children who think that if they have to say "I'm sorry" that they'll never be allowed to stop, that they'll have to apologize forever and ever. That explains why Liz can't admit to having indirectly wronged Therese; her failure to show pity comes from her fear of the woman. Simply put, Liz is terrified that Therese will somehow worm her way back into Anthony's life, depsite her obvious desire to have nothing to do with him and the life he represents, and push her aside, leaving her with nothing. The toddler who was left alone in the dark is still in charge of Liz's psyche so adult decisions and ways of thinking will probably never spontaneously occur.
Tags: liz: whining martyr, sitting duck therese
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